You are here -allRefer - Reference - Country Study & Country Guide - North Korea >

allRefer Reference and Encyclopedia Resource

allRefer    
allRefer
   


-- Country Study & Guide --     

 

North Korea

 
Country Guide
Afghanistan
Albania
Algeria
Angola
Armenia
Austria
Azerbaijan
Bahrain
Bangladesh
Belarus
Belize
Bhutan
Bolivia
Brazil
Bulgaria
Cambodia
Chad
Chile
China
Colombia
Caribbean Islands
Comoros
Cyprus
Czechoslovakia
Dominican Republic
Ecuador
Egypt
El Salvador
Estonia
Ethiopia
Finland
Georgia
Germany
Germany (East)
Ghana
Guyana
Haiti
Honduras
Hungary
India
Indonesia
Iran
Iraq
Israel
Cote d'Ivoire
Japan
Jordan
Kazakhstan
Kuwait
Kyrgyzstan
Latvia
Laos
Lebanon
Libya
Lithuania
Macau
Madagascar
Maldives
Mauritania
Mauritius
Mexico
Moldova
Mongolia
Nepal
Nicaragua
Nigeria
North Korea
Oman
Pakistan
Panama
Paraguay
Peru
Philippines
Poland
Portugal
Qatar
Romania
Russia
Saudi Arabia
Seychelles
Singapore
Somalia
South Africa
South Korea
Soviet Union [USSR]
Spain
Sri Lanka
Sudan
Syria
Tajikistan
Thailand
Turkmenistan
Turkey
Uganda
United Arab Emirates
Uruguay
Uzbekistan
Venezuela
Vietnam
Yugoslavia
Zaire

Appendix A. Tables

Table 1. Metric Conversion Coofficients and Factors

When you kowMultiply byTo find
Millimeters0.04inches
Centimeters0.39inches
Meters3.3feet
Kilometers0.62miles
Hectares2.47acres
Square kilometers0.39square miles
Cubic meters35.3cubic feet
Liters0.26gallons
Kilograms2.2pounds
Metric tons0.98long tons
1.1short tons
2,204pounds
Degrees Celsius (Centigrade)1.8 and add 32degrees Fahrenheit

Table 2. Ten Major Targets and Interim Results for Third Seven-Year Plan (1987-93) by Sector

(in millions of tons unless otherwise indicated)
SectorTarget for 1989Results by 1989Target for 1993
Electricity1100.060.0100.0
Coal120.070.0120.0
Steel15.010.07.4
Nonferrous metals1.51.51.7
Cement20.012.022.0
Chemical fertilizers7.05.07.2
Textiles21.50.81.5
Marine products5.03.111.0
Grains15.010.015.0
Tideland cultivation3300.0n.a.300.0

n.a.--not available.
1In billions of kilowatt-hours.
2In billions of meters.
3In hectares.

Source: Based on information from Kita Chosen no keizai to boeki no tenbo (North Korean Economic and Trade Prospects), Tokyo, 1991, 131-79; and Pukhan kyngje ui chngae kwajng (The Development Process of the North Korean Economy), Seoul, 1990, 246-48.

Table 3. Government Budget, Selected Years, 1975-91

(in billions of wn)1
197519801987 19912
ValuePercentageValueP ercentageValuePercentageValue Percentage
Revenues11.6100.019.1100.030.3100.037.1100.0
Expenditures
National economy6.758.811.460.320.066.425.267.9
Social and cultural2.622.84.222.25.718.96.918.7
Military1.916.42.814.64.013.24.612.3
Administration0.21.80.52.60.51.70.41.0
Total expenditures311.4100.018.9100.030.2100.037.1100.0

1For value of the wn--see Glossary.
2Planned.
3Figures may not add to totals because of rounding.

Source: Based on information from Economist Intelligence Unit, Country Profile: China, North Korea, 1990-91, London, 1991, 76-77; Kita Chosen no keizai to boeki no tenbo (North Korean Economic and Trade Prospects), Tokyo, 1991, 7-9; and Pukhan kyngje ui chngae kwajng (The Development Process of the North Korean Economy), Seoul, 1990, 188-202.

Table 4. Planned and Actual Production of Selected Industrial and Agricultural Products by Economic Plan, 1961-93

(in millions of tons unless otherwise indicated)
Product1961-701971- 761978-841987-93
PlannedActualPlannedA ctualPlannedActualPlannedActu al1
Electricity217.016.528-3029.750-6050.0100.054.0
Coal25.027.550-5355.070-8070.0120.083.0
Steel2.32.23.83.8- 4.07.4-8.07.4-8.010.06.9
Cement4.34.07.5-8.08.012-1312- 1322.013.0
Chemical fertilizers1.71.52.8-3.03.05.05.07.2n.a.
Textiles3500.0400.0500-6005808008001,500.0850.0
Marine products1.21.11.6-1.81.63.53.511.03.7
Grains6.65.07.0-7.58.010.010.015.010.0

n.a.--not available.
11988 figures.
2In billions of kilowatt-hours.
3In millions of meters.

Source: Based on information from Joseph S. Chung, "Economic Planning in North Korea," in Robert A. Scalapino and Kim Jun-yop (eds.), North Korea Today, Berkeley, 1983, 170-71; and Kita Chosen no keizai to boeki no tenbo (North Korean Economic and Trade Prospects), Tokyo, 1991, 34-35.

Table 5. Economic Assistance from Communist Countries and the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), 1945-84

(in hundreds of thousands of United States dollars)
Source of Assistance1945-491950- 601961-691970- 761978-84
GrantsLoansGrantsLoan sGrantsLoansGrantsLoans GrantsLoans
Communist countries
Soviet Union05305,1481,98501,96709,06002,962
China003,3601,72501,0500162,5870
East Germany001,014003500000
Other Eastern Europe003,26339000000
Total communist countries053012,7853,7490 3,36709,0762,5872,962
OECD00000000012,420

Source: Based on information from Jung Mo Kang, "North Korea's Trade and Economic Cooperation," Seoul, January 1992; and Republic of Korea National Unification Board, Statistics of North Korean Economy, Seoul, 1986, various pages.

Table 6. Value of Exports to Communist and Noncommunist Countries, Selected Years, 1984-90

(in millions of United States dollars)
1984198619881990
Communist countries
Soviet Union447.9642.0887.31,047.4
China247.5255.2212.3141.5
Other51.456.485.267.7
Total communist countries746.8953.61,184.81,256.6
Noncommunist countries
Industrial countries
Japan131.1154.3293.3271.2
West Germany135.164.141.050.7 Other16.115.039.739.0
Total industrial countries282.3233.4374.0360.9
Developing countries
Africa3.413.815.117.1
Asia62.687.3173.6175.2
Middle East13.44.63.92.5
Western Hemisphere2.14.536.644.9
Total developing countries81.5110.2229.2239.7
Total noncommunist countries363.8343.6603.2600.6
TOTAL1,110.61,297.21,788.01,857.2

Source: Based on information from Kita Chosen no keizai to boeki no tenbo (North Korean Economic and Trade Prospects), Tokyo, 1991, 92-93.

Table 7. Value of Imports from Communist and Noncommunist Countries, Selected Years, 1984-90

(in millions of United States dollars)
1984198619881990
Communist countries
Soviet Union467.91,186.51,921.71,667.9
China248.8280.8379.7403.4
Other53.655.178.684.5
Total communist countries770.31,522.42,380.2,155.8
Noncommunist countries
Industrial countries
Japan279.4203.7262.7193.7
West Germany24.942.744.168.7
Other81.084.4160.1210.7
Total industrial countries385.3330.8466.9473.1
Developing countries
Africa1.82.311.22.5
Asia128.2143.8258.4259.1
Middle East2.514.56.13.1
Western Hemisphere1.78.344.226.2
Total developing countries134.2168.9319.9290.9
Total noncommunist countries519.5499.7786.8764.0
TOTAL1,289.82,022.13,166.82,919.8

Source: Based on information from Kita Chosen no keizai to boeki no tenbo (North Korean Economic and Trade Prospects), Tokyo, 1991, 92-93.

Table 8. Chronology of Meetings Between North Korean and South Korean Prime Ministers, September 1990-December 1992

DateLocation
September 1990Seoul
October 1990P'yngyang
December 1990Seoul
October 19911P'yngyang
December 19912Seoul
February 19923P'yngyang
May 19924Seoul
September 1992P'yngyang
December 19925Seoul

1 Originally scheduled for February 1991.
2 Agreement on Reconciliation, Nonaggression, Exchanges, and Cooperation between the North and South signed December 13. Meeting led to December 31, 1991, initialing of Declaration on the Denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula and decision to establish a Joint Nuclear Control Committee after ratification of the declaration.
3 Exchanged ratified copies of the two December 1991 agreements. Agreed on composition of the membership of three subcommittees--Exchanges and Cooperation Committee, Military Committee, and North-South Political Committee.
4 Signed a series of protocols for the subcommittees established by treaty in the February agreement; later in May set up the North-South liaison offices in P'anmunjm. Agreed to allow at least 100 separated families to have brief reunion visits in August.
5 Scheduled, but not held.

Table 9. Ground Forces Order of Battle, 1992

Number
Strength1,100,000+
Organization
Corps
Conventional8
Mechanized4
Armor1
Artillery2
Geographic1
Military district commands9
Infantry divisions26-30
Reserve and pacification divisions22-26
Infantry brigades3-6
Reserve and pacification brigades18+
Mechanized and mobile brigades23-30
Armor brigades14-15
Artillery brigades20-30
Special operations forces brigades22
Special operations forces battalions7
Equipment
Total medium and light tanks3,600
T-54/55/592,200+
T-62600+
T-34n.a.
APCs2,500
Other light tanks (PT-76/China's T-62/63 and North Korea's M-1985)n.a.
Artillery
Self-propelled5,500+
Towed3,000+
Multiple rocket launchers2,400
Mortars
60-160mm9,000+

n.a.--not available.

Table 10. Navy Order of Battle, 1992

Number
Strength40,000-60,000
Organization Fleets2
Squadrons
East Sea9
Yellow Sea5
Equipment
Frigate1
Corvettes2
Submarines
Whiskey class4
Romeo class19
Missile attack boats (PTG)39
Coastal patrol boats
PT200
PC/PCS/PB120
PCFS60
Unspecified20
Amphibious craft
Nampo100
AVC40+
LCM/LCU32+
Unspecified23
Mine warfare craft23

Table 11. Air Force Order of Battle, 1992

Number
Strength70,000
Organization
Air combat commands3
Air division1
Interceptor regiments12
Ground attack regiments
Il-283
Su-25/71
MiG-19/A-52
MiG-15/172
Transport regiments
An-26
Unspecified6
Helicopter regiments6
Equipment
Total aircraft
Jets760
Bombers82
Transports480
Helicopters300
MiG-15/17, air-to-air and ground attack310
MiG-19, air-to-air60+
MiG-19/A-5, primarily ground attack100+
MiG-21, air-to-air160+
MiG-23, air-to-air46
MiG-29, air-to-air14
Su-7, primarily ground attack20
Su-25, primarily ground attack20
Il-28, primarily ground attack82
An-2, transport250+
An-24, transport10
Unspecified transports and trainers200+
Mi-2/4/8/17 helicopters210+
MD-500 helicopters87

Table 12. Arms Trade, Selected Years, 1979-89

(in millions of United States dollars)1
YearImportsExports
Value2Percentage of Total Imports3Value2Percentage of Total Exports3
197933816.21456.8
198126912.267235.5
198323112.726815.7
198543322.139825.4
1987452n.a.430n.a.
1989525n.a.400n.a.

n.a.--not available.
1 In constant 1989 dollars.
2 To avoid the appearance of excessive accuracy, arms transfer data have been independently rounded, with greater severity for large numbers. Because of this rounding and the fact that they are obtained from different sources, world arms exports do not equal world arms imports.
3 Because some countries exclude arms imports or exports from their trade statistics and their "total" imports and exports are therefore understated and because arms transfers may be estimated independently of trade data, the resulting ratios of arms to total imports or exports may be overstated and may even exceed 100 percent.

Source: Based on information from United States, Arms Control and Disarmament Agency, World Military Expenditures and Arms Transfers, 1990, Washington, 1991, 111.


North Korea - TABLE OF CONTENTS


Go Up - Top of Page

Make allRefer Reference your HomepageAdd allRefer Reference to your FavoritesGo to Top of PagePrint this PageSend this Page to a Friend


Information Courtesy: The Library of Congress - Country Studies


Content on this web site is provided for informational purposes only. We accept no responsibility for any loss, injury or inconvenience sustained by any person resulting from information published on this site. We encourage you to verify any critical information with the relevant authorities.

 

 

 
 


About Us | Contact Us | Terms of Use | Privacy | Links Directory
Link to allRefer | Add allRefer Search to your site

allRefer
All Rights reserved. Site best viewed in 800 x 600 resolution.