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Japan

 
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Japan

VALUES AND BELIEFS

[JPEG]

Practitioners of kendo--the "way of the sword"-- a form of spiritual discipline combined with ancient Chinese fencing techniques
Courtesy Eliot Frankeberger

[JPEG]

People and goods being ferried from Nagasaki
Courtesy The Mainichi Newspapers

[JPEG]

The 160-meter-high torii gate at Itsukushima Shrine, in Hiroshima Bay, dedicated to Shinto kami, who protect seafarers and oversee fishing
Courtesy Jane T. Griffin

[JPEG]

Buddhist monk
Courtesy Sheila Page Gault

[JPEG]

Buddhist nun
Courtesy Kelsey Saint

[JPEG]

Shinto presentation ceremony for girls ages seven and five
Courtesy Sheila Page Gault

Contemporary Japan is a secular society. Creating harmonious relations with others through reciprocity and the fulfillment of social obligations is more significant for most Japanese than an individual's relationship to a transcendent God. Harmony, order, and self-development are three of the most important values that underlie Japanese social interaction. Basic ideas about self and the nature of human society are drawn from several religious and philosophical traditions. Religious practice, too, emphasizes the maintenance of harmonious relations with others (both spiritual beings and other humans) and the fulfillment of social obligations as a member of a family and a community.

Data as of January 1994



Japan - TABLE OF CONTENTS

  • Section - Japan -. The Society and Its Environment

  • Japanese Education and the Arts

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