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Mongolia

 
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Mongolia

Incidence of Crime

In the late 1980s, the most common crimes were theft and embezzlement of state property, black-marketing, juvenile delinquency, misappropriation of materials (food and drugs, for example), and speculation (such as selling automobiles). To combat these crimes, the authorities called for better enforcement of laws, harsher punishment for criminals, and additional public involvement in fighting crime.

Hooliganism and vandalism by juvenile delinquents in the towns and cities also caused the authorities grave concern. Much of this activity was attributed to the rising rate of divorce and to broken homes. To combat this situation, the authorities called for efforts to strengthen the family structure; to ensure better compliance with family and marriage laws; to improve the laws on family, marriage, child adoption, and guardianship; and to better integrate schools with the job market, in order to discourage idleness among students more effectively.

In 1989 Mongolian government and party leaders, now less fearful of foreign threat, were taking steps to reduce the size of the armed forces and to make further use of the skills of demobilized military personnel in support of the civilian economy. The leaders were more concerned with the threats of corruption and of incompetence in law enforcement that allowed for an increase in crime, especially economic crimes. To remedy this situation, the Mongolian People's Revolutionary Party called for renewed efforts to reform law-enforcement organizations by enhancing the role of the Ministry of Justice, to ensure the independence of prosecutors, and to improve the training and evaluation of judicial cadre.

 * * *

Little has been published on the Mongolian armed forces. What is available is mainly historical, such as the discussion of the great Mongol conquests of the thirteenth century in History of the Mongolian People's Republic, published by the Soviet Akademia Nauk, and an account of the exploits of the Mongolian People's Army in World War II in the History of the Mongolian People's Republic, available in William A. Brown's and Urgunge Onon's English translation. William R. Heaton's and Kenneth Jarrett's articles in Asian Survey provide insight into the evolving Mongolian perception of the military threat from China. Military Balance [London] each year provides an up-to-date table of organization and equipment for the Mongolian armed forces. Albert P. Blaustein and Gisbert H. Flanz's Constitutions of the Countries of the World and William E. Butler's The Mongolian Legal System provide indispensable information on the legal system. (For further information and complete citations, see Bibliography.)

Data as of June 1989

Mongolia - TABLE OF CONTENTS

  • National Security


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